A rare glimpse inside a hidden Niagara Falls treasure

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The Canadian Niagara Power Generating Station has struck a formidable pose near the edge of the Niagara River for more than a century.

Many people have admired the architecture of the massive stone building, but few have ever glimpsed inside.

Until now.

More than 3,000 people toured the decommissioned power plant on Saturday and Sunday as part of the provincewide Doors Open Ontario program.

Guests enjoyed a behind-the-scenes tour of the interior of the 114-year-old plant, including access to the enormous room housing the 11 original generators and the original control room.

"We've driven by this place so many times and we always wonder, 'What's in there?' So when the opportunity came, we jumped at it," said Richard Plato, who toured the plant with his wife Margaret.

The original plan was to offer 1,600 free tickets online to reserve a spot for the exclusive tour.

But demand for tickets was so high that the event sold out within minutes. Organizers then offered another 1,600 tickets for a second day, which, too, were claimed immediately.

"We were both on the computer at the same time," Richard Plato recalled. "I couldn't get in, but she did."

They were impressed with what they saw.

The Canadian Niagara Power Generating Station has struck a formidable pose near the edge of the Niagara River for more than a century.

Many people have admired the architecture of the massive stone building, but few have ever glimpsed inside.

Until now.

More than 3,000 people toured the decommissioned power plant on Saturday and Sunday as part of the provincewide Doors Open Ontario program.

Guests enjoyed a behind-the-scenes tour of the interior of the 114-year-old plant, including access to the enormous room housing the 11 original generators and the original control room.

"We've driven by this place so many times and we always wonder, 'What's in there?' So when the opportunity came, we jumped at it," said Richard Plato, who toured the plant with his wife Margaret.

The original plan was to offer 1,600 free tickets online to reserve a spot for the exclusive tour.

But demand for tickets was so high that the event sold out within minutes. Organizers then offered another 1,600 tickets for a second day, which, too, were claimed immediately.

"We were both on the computer at the same time," Richard Plato recalled. "I couldn't get in, but she did."

They were impressed with what they saw.